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Archive for August, 2010

Stop Sleeping Through the Alarm

Stop Sleeping Through the Alarm ClockWhat sense would it make if every time your alarm went off to wake you in the morning, you said “Oh, there’s my alarm. I guess that means I’ll go back to sleep?”

Not much sense in that at all.

Well, every time you notice you’re feeling anxious or depressed or starting to think about using food to cope and then actually restrict, binge, or purge, you are doing exactly that. You are, in essence, noticing the alarm (your anxiety, your depressed feelings, your thoughts of using a coping strategy) and then going back to sleep through numbing out and focusing on food.

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Overcoming Jealousy and Insecurity (Podcast)

Overcoming Jealousy and Insecurity (Podcast)

If you’ve ever wondered why certain people or situations trigger you to feel so insecure or jealous at times, this recording will give you the answer. Listen to Michelle Morand’s Overcoming Jealousy and Insecurity (Podcast)

Our insecurities often lead us to use food to cope, whether through dieting or restriction, overeating, or through full disordered eating such as anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorder. 

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to understand why you feel insecure and to be able to take action to start feeling stronger and more confident in yourself today? Imagine how likely you’d be to reach for food to cope if you felt confident and secure in yourself overall? Listen in to this week’s podcast and learn what’s at the root of your jealousy and insecurity and some simple things you can do to change that pattern today.

Posted in: 2010, CEDRIC Centre, Podcast

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Guess What?! Today I’m Going to do 100 Push Ups!

CEDRIC Centre - Guess What?!I’m going to do 100 push ups when I exercise today! All at once, too!

Forget the fact that I was only able to do 10 yesterday, or any other day before, for that matter! I think 15 was my best day. Maybe 2 sets of 15 once or twice….

But today I’m going to do 100! Guaranteed! And you know why? Because I’m tired of having weak arms. I’m tired of wishing I could do 100 and only ever doing 10 and then feeling crappy about myself for not being able to do 100 and then going days and days without doing a single one. Something’s got to change. I’m tired of this measly little 10-push-up self. No pain no gain, right!?

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Posted in: 2010, CEDRIC Centre, newsletter, Relationship with Self

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A Note on Jealousy and Insecurity

Jealousy and InsecurityOne of the most obvious forms of all-or-nothing thinking that we humans engage in is a little thing we call the green-eyed monster, a.k.a. good, old-fashioned jealousy.

On the surface jealousy appears to be a simple thought, one that has you wanting something or someone that someone else “has”. But that thought has very deep roots and is itself rampant with all-or-nothing thinking which only makes you feel stuck, hopeless, and diminished. Anger is a response to a threat. We only ever feel angry when we truly feel sad and scared about something. Jealousy has a strong element of anger, a sense of judgement and injustice that belies our underlying fear and sadness. And why are we sad and scared? Well because when we’re aware of feeling jealous of someone it means we must have had the following thought just a second before:

“They” have something you not only want but believe you “should” have, and by virtue of “Them” having that thing, you are less likely to have it yourself, and not having that thing makes you less valuable, less worthy than they are. Therefore, your worth / okay-ness as a person is dependent on that person.
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An All or Nothing Thinking Refresher for You

all or nothing thinkingThis week I feel compelled to expand a bit on a key piece from last week’s article on Stopping the Triggers. I want to further explore how your training in all-or-nothing thinking makes the process of complete recovery harder than it needs to be. And that, until you learn to perceive yourself and your world in a more balanced, adult way, your need for food and body focus to cope with life will remain.

As I mentioned last week, it is the child’s perspective on the world that thinks in all-or-nothing, black or white, good or bad terms, and is full of absolutes.

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